How to Master Content Marketing

How to Master Content Marketing

Content writing isn’t quite the same as writing for school. There’s no rubric. No grading scale. It’s up to you to understand the intended audience. The topic of interest. The length of writing. The organization.

You have to be able to read the audience like a book, and it’s not a book the teacher is forcing you to read. You must care enough to understand your readers, and this starts with the question, “Who is my audience?”  What would they want to read? What would intrigue them? It’s not about you anymore.

Hand holding pages of an open book resting on edge of a table

 

Failure is not an option.

A teacher isn’t going to circle a big, red letter F on your paper if you don’t get it right, it’s up to you to know. The writing you publish creates a brand for your company, and this can make or break a business.

male teacher in striped polo writing on chalkboard while student texts on phone

Content must be geared towards the products or services you offer and what the readers want to know. Put yourself in their shoes and ask these questions.

What tips would be helpful to know?

What questions do I have about their services?

What worries do I have about this company?

Use these questions to build your own rubric based on the needs of your audience. Create content satisfying this rubric to draw your audience in.

 

Create the full package.

You might have the best content, but if it’s packaged in an unappealing way, nobody’s going to read it. Would you expect a Tiffany necklace in a brown cardboard box? You’d never know it’s there because you wouldn’t open it without the Tiffany Blue box.

two outstretched hands holding small cardboard box with cream bow

It’s time to leave behind the 7 sentence paragraphs they teach you about in school. Forget the intro paragraph, 3-5 body paragraphs, and conclusion format you’ve followed for years. Let’s be honest… would you want to read that? Didn’t think so.

Even if your writing is chock-full of interesting, relevant content, your audience won’t read it if it looks too intimidating. Consider implementing the following to increase readability and appeal.

  • Choose catchy, relevant titles
  • Break up large sections of text
  • Use subheadings
  • Include photos
  • Convey data with infographics
  • Use bulleted or numbered lists when applicable

 

One size doesn’t fit all.

You aren’t just writing a paper for one teacher anymore. You need a way to appeal to a wide variety of readers within your audience. Marketing strategies vary greatly based on the business. Depending on your market and audience, the strategy changes. There is an audience for every company, and the way you tailor writing to them is crucial.

white puzzle pieces fit together with one piece missing

If you’re a technical business whose only appeal is to qualified professionals in that field, then including technical data and words is beneficial. This will prove that your company is qualified.

If you have a wider audience and are appealing to the average citizen, you may want to dial it back. While a large vocabulary, complex sentences, and intellectual data may be impressive, it’s hard to read. Your readers will tire out and won’t keep reading. Instead, engage the reader and make it feel conversational. You want them to feel comfortable, included, and a part of your brand. You’re not writing a research paper, you’re helping the audience get to know your company.

 

Combining customized content with the perfect packaging can take you from a B to an A+ marketing writer. The key is to know the needs of your audience and work from there. Make sure your writing is relevant to the readers and easy for them to understand. You’re trying to sell your business, but also make potential clients feel informed and appreciated. If you’re interested in developing a better marketing strategy tailored to your audience, feel free to let us know! We’d love to help!

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Leisha

Leisha is Iconic's content writer and brand storyteller. She makes it her mission to tell engaging stories and create memorable brand experiences.