Do You Have A Website TMI Problem? | Website Content Strategy

Do You Have A Website TMI Problem? | Website Content Strategy

Website content strategy - too much informationWe live in an age in which information is widely available. If you’ve got the gumption and a DIY soul, you can Google everything from how to groom your dog to how to change the headlights in your car. With so much information available everywhere, how can you possibly gauge how much information to put on your business’s website? Is it possible to have a case of Website TMI (too much information)? Let’s take a look at your website content strategy to see…

There IS such a thing as website TMI.

Let’s make an analogy. You are buying a car. You want a car that gets you from Point A to Point B. Maybe you want heated seats and a sunroof. You probably have an idea of the number of people you want to fit in your car.

When you get to the dealer, you begin asking about cars that fit your criteria… but instead of giving you that information, the dealer pulls out detailed maps of their cars’ engines and begins going through how the engines of their vehicles work.

“I don’t really care how the engine works,” you say, a little annoyed that he isn’t listening to your questions. “Of course I want a great engine, but what I really want to know is which of your sedans gets the best gas milage.”

The dealer nods and pulls out paperwork that shows tons of complicated graphs detailing the engine’s gas usage.

You can’t get out of there fast enough, right? The problem:  INFORMATION OVERLOAD. You don’t care how the engine works… you just care that it does work. You don’t care about nitty gritty details… you just want to know if it fits your unique needs.

The problem with website TMI.

All information is not created equal in the eyes of your consumer. The dealer is greatly concerned with engine design and crash test ratings… and he SHOULD be! But you, as the customer, have a different set of concerns.

Consumers can get information FAST nowadays. If your website isn’t giving consumers the information they need quickly, they will find another provider who will do that for them.

How to tell if your website has a TMI problem.

So we’ve established that TMI is often bad for business. But you are so immersed in your business, and you are used to thinking like an expert. Trust us, being an expert in your field is a very good thing… but now, you have to dial the information back to keep consumers from feeling overwhelmed. Here are some things to think about that should help you determine if your website has a TMI problem.

  • Ask yourself, “If I knew NOTHING about my business, would this website make sense to me?”
  • Ask yourself, “How are my concerns as an expert different from my consumer’s concerns as a buyer?”
  • Have a friend (that knows NOTHING about your business) read through your content. Do they understand it?
  • Make a list of what questions your customers are asking you. This is the type of information they WANT. Is this information readily available on your site? If so, is it easily accessible, or is it buried in a lot of unnecessary details?
  • Take a step back and ask yourself, “What does my customer really want to know in order to take the step to connect with me?” Trust us, the answer is not “Every detail possible.”
  • Talk to current, reliable customers. What information did they need to make a buying decision? What was it that ultimately led them to choose you as a provider?

Simplify your website content strategy.

Now that you’ve targeted your website TMI problem, it’s time to solve it. Maybe it’s time to chuck all of your content out the window and start with a fresh mindset. Plan your website content strategy with your customer in mind. If you find yourself getting bogged down in the details, ask yourself, “Does my customer really want to read what I am writing about?”

If you need help simplifying and strategizing, we know a team that can help. Lining out a website properly can help you gain qualified leads online. Together, we can find a way to connect with customers by giving them just the right amount of information.

 

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Carolyn Byard